Sunday, 7 February 2016

A Saturday in February
Viennese Moments


Reclaiming the Outdoors
Late lunch hour at Karmeliter Markt

Photographed 6 February 2016
in Leopoldstadt (2nd District)
Images and Text © by Merisi

Friday, 5 February 2016

Coffee, anyone?
Kleiner Brauner at Café Gloriette


Single Espresso with Milk
Served the Viennese Way, on a silvery tray
with a glass of water, topped by a downturned spoon

Photographed at Café Gloriette
Gardens of Schönbrunn
Image and Text © by Merisi

Harbingers of Spring
Don't look back, look ahead


White Hellebores
White hellebores in a planter
Café Ansari
Praterstrasse 15


Photographed 1 February 2016
Looking in both directions in Leopoldstadt
2nd District
Images and Text © by Merisi
Link:
-> Café Ansari's hellebores heralding spring in 2014

Thursday, 4 February 2016

Coffee, anyone?
We'll always have Demel


A Quiet Moment
Demel Pâtisserie Café
Kohlmarkt 14

Image © by Merisi

Link: Homepage of Demel Pâtisserie Café

Rainy Day Blues
Viennese Moments


Wien Mitte Railway Station
Landstrasser Hauptstraße

Photographed 1 February 2016
© by Merisi
Link:
"Wien Mitte is a rail and U-Bahn station in Vienna, close to the city centre. It is the city terminus of Vienna's City Airport Train (CAT), which provides non-stop service to Vienna International Airport.[...] The journey to the airport via CAT takes 16 minutes."
"Landstraße U-Bahn station is serviced by both U3 and U4 and has 4 platforms. U4 goes north and south of the station whilst U3 goes west and south-east."
-> Quoted from Wien Mitte Railway Station @ Wikipedia

Wednesday, 3 February 2016

In loving Memory of Café Orlando di Castello
A Viennese Feast that ended way too soon

Originally published under the title
What you see and what you get
Viennese diversionary Tactics


A Camel Hair Overcoat
or a Livio de Marchi sculpture?


A Viennese Mélange
or an Italian Cappuccino?


A Dream within a Dream
or Café Orlando di Castello?


A storefront
or an all too clever diversionary tactic


to distract you from
that little Chocolate "ménage à trois"
I had with my coffee?

Photographed 2 April 2012
at Café Orlando di Castello
and at Fütterergasse


Images and Text © by Merisi

Tuesday, 2 February 2016

Groundhog Day
The Viennese Way


Once upon a time,
I had my own personal groundhog.

We passed each other frequently
at the intersection of Democracy Boulevard
and Seven Locks Road,
Zip code 20854


He would sit by the road, on the Cabin John Creek side,
and give me a regal wave with his right paw.
I wonder if anybody has seen him lately.
Today, perchance, on Groundhog Day?


There is no Groundhog Day in Vienna.
Austrian groundhogs prefer to live the high life,
- high as in high in the Alps -
and not a single one of them would be silly enough
to dig himself up through something like ten feet of snow
to check his shadow on the second day of February.
They rather brew themselves another pot of coffee or tea,
and wait for April showers to wash away the whole white mess.


There being no Groundhogs in Vienna,
therefore no Groundhog Day,
I had to invent my own little weather forecast game:
How about counting cakes instead,
I said to myself when I spotted a little merry-go-round,
ferrying cakes, round and round and round:
If the number of cakes passing is an even one,
winter will soon end!

If on the other hand,
the number is an uneven one
,
I shall go in and eat that culprit,
to make sure that winter will not continue
for six more weeks!
I was ecstatic about my ingenuity:
I felt like Don Quixote,
ready to saddle Rosinante attack
windmills with my Dulcinea sword cake fork.


A rather dizzying task,
as it turned out:
Those pesky cakes sped by so fast,
I had hardly time to push the shutter release button,
let alone count!
I must confess,
I failed. I failed the quest!


I forgot to count,
absorbed as I was to get ahold of a picture
of each of the cakes to document their number.


The cakes
passed by,


and passed
again,


and again!
I was so exhausted from not-counting,
I could not even recall anymore
whether an even number meant
seven more weeks of winter
or instant spring!

I do miss the good old days
with my Very Own Groundhog:
A look and a light wave of my hand
was all it took back then.


Photographed at:
Aida Café Bognergasse, the snowballs;
and all those cakes, at
Café Weinwurm, Stephansplatz 11,
in the shadow of St. Stephen's Cathedral!

Images and Text © by Merisi
First published on Groundhog Day 2009

April in February
Rainbow City


Rainbow over Praterstraße
Lunch hour surprise


Mochi and Ansari Piazza
No, not the official address, only in my family's inner GPS, that is.
We always have a hard time deciding which restaurant to go to,
the Japanese inspired Mochi or to Ansari with the magic Georgian-Lebanese touch.
Sometimes we compromise by first eating to Mochi's and then
sneaking over to Ansari for coffee and dessert, or vice versa
Praterstraße 15


Nestroy Monument
In the background, the "Miethaus zum Jonas",
an 18th Century apartment building
Praterstrasse 19

Photographed yesterday during lunch hour
in Leopoldstadt, Vienna's Second District

Praterstraße 15 is located a minute or so as the crow flies
across the Donaukanal from Schwedenplatz in the First District
Images © by Merisi

Link:
-> Johann Nepomuk Nestroy (7 December 1801 – 25 May 1862) at Wikipedia:
"Johann Nepomuk Eduard Ambrosius Nestroy .... was a singer, actor and playwright in the popular Austrian tradition of the Biedermeier period and its immediate aftermath. Dubbed the "Austrian Shakespeare", in style he is more comparable to Molière."

"Nestroy's legacy:
About half of Nestroy's works have been revived by the modern German-speaking theatres and many are part and parcel of today's Viennese repertoire. However, few have ever been translated into English. Only one, Einen Jux will er sich machen, has become well known to English-speaking theatregoers. Interestingly, it has become a classic more than once. It was first adapted as Thornton Wilder's The Matchmaker (which later became the musical Hello, Dolly!) and later achieved success as the comic masterpiece On the Razzle, which was translated by Stephen Plaice and adapted by Tom Stoppard."